Check Your Free Credit Report Campaign

Man using a tablet and holding a credit card

By law, everybody can obtain three free credit reports each year at AnnualCreditReport.com. It is important to check your report regularly to make sure it is accurate and up to date. The credit reporting system is set up so that you are responsible for finding and correcting errors in your reports.

We encourage you to mark your calendars on 2/2, 6/6, and 10/10 this and every year as a reminder to request a copy of your free report on those days. You can order your free reports anytime during the year. The “2/2, 6/6, 10/10” reminder dates are meant as a simple way to remember to pull your free credit reports regularly. Download a calendar reminder for 2/2, 6/6 and 10/10.

 

More Information on Building and Maintaining Credit

Credit report and a pen
Check Your Free Credit Report for Signs of Fraud and Identity Theft

During the past year in Wisconsin, complaints to the Federal Trade Commission went from several hundred a month to a peak of 56,000 complaints in March 2021. The top complaint involved fraud, most often related to online shopping, followed by complaints about credit bureaus and financial services. Identity theft was the third most common complaint […]

Credit rpeort history puzzle
Check Your Free Credit Report

By law, everybody can obtain three free credit reports each year. The information in your credit report affects your life in important ways—your ability to get a loan, how much you pay for credit and insurance, securing a job, renting a house or apartment, and preventing identity theft. It is important to check your report […]

Credit report and a pen
Credit Report vs Credit Score

Many people use the terms “credit report” and “credit score” interchangeably, but they are not the same. Your credit report is a detailed account of your credit history, while your credit score is a three-digit number signifying your credit-worthiness. You are entitled to three free credit reports per year, but you generally have to pay to view your score.

Man using a tablet and holding a credit card
Order Your Free Credit Report

By law, you are entitled to three free credit reports every 12 months–one each from the three credit reporting bureaus: Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion.

Credit report and a pen
Read Your Credit Report

Information in Your Report Video Introduction to a Credit Report Sample Reports Identifying Potential Errors Dealing with Errors Monitoring Negative Information Information in Your Report Once you order a credit report from one of the three agencies, your report will appear on screen. We recommend printing your report (it might be long!) and saving it […]

Woman with a laptop making a phone call.
Fix Errors on Your Credit Report

The credit bureaus maintain tens of millions of reports, so they cannot verify the accuracy of the information in everybody’s reports. Fortunately, there are ways to identify and dispute errors in your credit report.

Woman sitting at a table with a notepad and laptop
Resources for Information About Credit Reports and Credit Scores

This article includes websites that offer more information about your credit report and related items, how to dispute errors in your credit report, and where to get help if you have fallen behind on payments or experienced other difficulties.

Dark computer screen with the word security on it.
Security Freezes and Fraud Alerts

Beginning in 2018, security freezes are free in Wisconsin. You can find more information about security freezes in the UW-Madison Division of Extension Credit Report Freeze fact sheet. If you believe you are the victim of identity theft, visit the Federal Trade Commission’s identity theft website, which lists the steps you need to take. The […]

Credit rpeort history puzzle
Credit Inquiries

Each time you or somebody else requests a copy of your credit file, the request is recorded on your credit report as an “inquiry.” Inquiries are listed on your free credit report.

 

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